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Author Topic: JRiver Adjust Volume PEQ Filter  (Read 1652 times)

designmule

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JRiver Adjust Volume PEQ Filter
« on: June 05, 2021, 07:41:41 pm »

I'm running a 2.1 setup via JRiver on linux. I've got my sub woofer set at plus 1 dB and for the sake of argument I have a 3dB boost on my left loud speaker at 100 Hz via parametric EQ. Do I need to insert an "Adjust the Volume" to the Parametric Equilizer filter to prevent digital clipping or does JRiver do this internally?
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mwillems

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Re: JRiver Adjust Volume PEQ Filter
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2021, 08:15:59 pm »

I'm running a 2.1 setup via JRiver on linux. I've got my sub woofer set at plus 1 dB and for the sake of argument I have a 3dB boost on my left loud speaker at 100 Hz via parametric EQ. Do I need to insert an "Adjust the Volume" to the Parametric Equilizer filter to prevent digital clipping or does JRiver do this internally?

Short answer: you should probably do an "adjust the volume" down by 3db.

Long answer: If you use "internal volume" and don't have it turned up all the way, JRiver will use the available headroom from internal volume to prevent digital clipping.  However, if you don't use internal volume or keep it turned all the way up, the audio will approach clipping, and then JRiver's "clip protection" will kick in.  The audio won't (likely) clip because JRiver has an emergency limiter built in and enabled by default.  So if sound would ever go above 0dBFS "clip protection" turns down the volume temporarily (unless you disabled it for some reason, but you shouldn't!).  Clip protection is great in an emergency/unusual case, but if you have permanent boost set up it's not ideal to rely on clip protection because music or films will wind up turning themselves down periodically (whenever they would otherwise clip in the loudest parts), and then get louder again, etc.. 

So, the "correct" solution is to either 1) offset any gain filters with a global volume reduction, 2) Use internal volume and set a maximum volume that leaves enough headroom for all your gain, or 3) only use cuts in the PEQ and avoid boost.  Any of those will work to avoid clipping without having to rely on the emergency limiter.
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