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Author Topic: J River Volume Control  (Read 10346 times)

iwf

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J River Volume Control
« on: May 07, 2013, 11:34:13 am »

I've traditionally used fixed volume both within the Mac and Windows environment. ASIO etc.

Now i'm about to try out a Teac DSD Dac which doesn't have any volume control (unlike my Bel Canto).

Can anyone advise what SQ compromises I'm taking using MC's internal volume controls.

I seemed to remember MC is very clever, just how clever I can't recall.


Many thanks

Iwf
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iwf

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2013, 05:19:10 pm »

Like the dim wit I am I hadn't searched the windows version forum for this topic.  There's several decent explanations up there.

So unless Matt says anything different I'm assume the MC volume control doesn't affect SQ. ::)
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kiwi

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2013, 07:10:58 pm »

Like the dim wit I am I hadn't searched the windows version forum for this topic.  There's several decent explanations up there.

So unless Matt says anything different I'm assume the MC volume control doesn't affect SQ. ::)

Yeah, that's my understanding.  As long as your DAC is a 24bit dac (which your teac is), you should be golden.  (unless you turn the volume down to 2% or something... in which case it probably doesn't matter.)
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Samson

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 08:37:33 pm »

Here is The Wiki on Volume Control, and here on Replay Gain
Here is an Interesting thread on Reference Volume Level

and from Computer Audiophile re SQ
Quote
JRiver Media Center 17 has a highly refined 64-bit software volume control and several different options for using or disabling volume control in the application and the computer in general. A few years ago many playback applications used 16-bit volume software controls. Whenever the volume was set to anything less than 100% / maximum the application would have to cut off bits of the outgoing audio, starting with the 16th bit, reducing dynamic range and quality of the audio. When playing 16-bit recordings this could become a problem quickly as more attenuation was used. Playing 24-bit recordings and using a 16-bit volume control was a disaster as the last 8 bits were automatically chopped off the top with any level attenuation. Then came 24-bit volume controls like that currently used in Apple's iTunes. Attenuating the level of a 16-bit recording with such a volume control is not that bad because there are 8 bits worth of zeros the listener can afford to lose without cutting into the actual audio. The maximum bits used by 24-bit recordings is around 20, thus providing a little breathing room for a 24-bit volume control. A little attenuation and no important bits are cut off. Although the HDCD flag in HDCD recordings is on the Least Significant Bit (LSB) or 24th bit and will be lost with any attenuation by a 24-bit volume control. MC v17 uses a 64-bit volume control that provides at least 40 bits of breathing room for all 24-bit high resolution music. In theory a 64-bit volume control allows the listener to attenuate the level by over 240dB before cutting into the 24th bit of recording. However, in practice any volume attenuation cuts into a 24-bit track when the DAC in use only accepts 24-bits on the input. Converting a 24-bit file to 64-bits as MC does internally and attenuating the volume still reduces the number of bits starting with the 24th bit when output to the DAC simply because the hardware doesn't accept 64-bit audio. This is simply a hardware limitation. Nonetheless a 64-bit volume control offers real precision improvements when processing items such as upsampling, room correction, and bass management.

There are several volume modes and options available in MC 17 including Application Volume, Internal Volume, System Volume, Disabled Volume, and Volume Protection. Even if a user doesn't employ any volume attenuation it's nice to understand what each volume mode accomplishes.
    System Volume - Controls the volume of every sound coming from the computer. Similar to a master volume. Doesn't work when outputting via modes such as WASAPI - Event Style that send audio directly to the audio card or DAC.
    Application Volume - Controls only the volume of JRiver Media center as long as it's running on Windows Vista or a newer version of the operating system. JRiver doesn't recommend this volume mode for users seeking the best sound quality. Doesn't work when outputting via modes such as WASAPI - Event Style that send audio directly to the audio card or DAC.
    Internal Volume - This is the higher quality 64-bit volume control used by the JRiver audio engine. It's less important for listeners outputting bit perfect audio and very important for listeners using DSP options like upsampling, room correction, or bass management.
    Disabled Volume - As the name suggests this disables all volume controls. I use this mode when sending bit perfect audio to an external DAC.
    Volume Protection - This feature saves listener's ears and tweeters by not allowing volume increases over 5% at a time or 20% per second, and resets the volume to 10%, unless already lower, if playback has been stopped for 30 minutes.
    Startup Volume - There are two options for startup volume. 1. Optimize volume for best sound quality: is only applicable to Windows XP and earlier operating systems. The feature sets the Wave Out volume to 100% on MC startup. 2. Set volume: simply sets the MC volume to the the specified level when launching the application. Both options are available in Tools > Options > Startup.

Pasted from <http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/436-jriver-media-center-17-detail/>


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johnjen

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2013, 11:48:21 pm »

The description for Disabled Volume was most insightful.

Still testing to see if it is a noticeable change.

JJ
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randytsuch

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 09:30:24 am »

I wonder if the information above applies to DSD?
I think it was intended for PCM.

It was informative, thanks for supplying.

Randy
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jtwrace

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Re: J River Volume Control
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 09:29:29 pm »

I tried to Disable Volume but it all crashed.  Log sent.

This is in hopes of setting up 190 as best as possible for the best playback. 
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